Jun
2
11:00am11:00am

Brian Squillace on Creating Unique Design Processes to Support Communities

For nearly two decades Brian Squillace has encouraged discourse on community empowerment and activism though architecture.  His work focuses on creating a unique design process to best support each community he serves.  Crafting the approach is critical to creating a safe space that allows participants to look beyond their day-to-day activities, acknowledge challenges, seek opportunities and strategize the implementation to enact change.

Through work that includes citizen-led development, sweat-equity design-build and asset based community planning, Brian knows the importance in bringing diverse voices together and helping to build new partnerships.  He advocates for the community to have ownership of and pride in the design intent if a designer’s best laid plans for sustainability, change-making and resiliency are to be effective.  To understand, and best benefit those that we serve, the architectural process must start long before conceptual design and look beyond the confines of the built environment.

Brian will share strategies and reflections from working closely with diverse clients in architectural and master planning efforts that range from cohousing, mission-based development, affordable housing, higher education, K-12 and child care.

The CPID Talks are aimed at fostering a dialogue about interesting work being done that is relevant to the public interest design field by inviting speakers from a wide variety of disciplines to share their work and thoughts in an informal setting. These talks are open to the public and held in the CPID office in the School of Architecture at PSU (Shattuck Hall 217).

Free and open to the public.

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May
19
12:00pm12:00pm

Michael Heyn on Fighting for the Common Good and Interests of the Poor Across the Developing World

Michael Heyn spent over 40 years working in international development for the United Nations, living across 15 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Europe.  Following undergraduate and graduate degrees at Stanford University, he entered the Peace Corps in 1964 and lived in a small village in the high Altiplano of Peru assisting in the founding of a chicken raising cooperative for income generation.   The experience in facing the harsh realities of the villagers lives and the difficulties and disappointments in achieving their long-term goals was seminal in grounding and shaping his entire future career.  He dedicated himself along with many other UN colleagues to placing and keeping the poor at the center of development no matter what type of project they were pursuing to find more effective ways of addressing and alleviating the underlying root causes of their chronic poverty.

Over his journey, he discovered that development was about much more than economic pursuits.  It was mainly about human development specially for realizing peoples’ rights and gaining opportunities and power to take charge and advance their lives.  He learned that such basic empowerment along with a commitment to good governance was essential to realizing sustainable results, whether to increase their agricultural production, or better their health and educational status, or improve their urban neighborhoods and public space.   

Michael will share with us his long and often challenging learning curve and the inevitable mistakes and missteps that eventually brought insights as to how and what change must take place if there is to be a fundamental transformation in the lives of the poor.

Michael has held UN leadership positions including as UN Special Delegate (Kosovo), UNDP Regional Representative (Asia, Bangkok), UN Special Coordinator of the Secretary General for Emergency Relief Operations (Liberia), UNFPA Country Director (South Pacific, Nepal, Kenya), UNDP Director of Indigenous Peoples’ Development (Bangladesh), and UNDP Senior Adviser for Conflict Prevention (Yemen).  Throughout all these roles and responsibilities, he has maintained a sharp focus on improving the lives and dignity of the poor, and will share the opportunities for others, whatever their field of interest, to do the same.

The CPID Talks are aimed at fostering a dialogue about interesting work being done that is relevant to the public interest design field by inviting speakers from a wide variety of disciplines to share their work and thoughts in an informal setting. These talks are open to the public and held in the CPID office in the School of Architecture at PSU (Shattuck Hall 217).

Free and open to the public.

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May
5
11:00am11:00am

Mark Lakeman on Placemaking Through Engagement

Mark Lakeman will speak in an upcoming edition of CPID Talks on Friday, May 5th. Mark is a national leader in the development of sustainable public places. In the last decade he has directed, facilitated, or inspired designs for more than three hundred new community-generated public places in Portland, Oregon alone. He is a Principal and Designer at Communitecture Inc., a full service design firm that aims to create beautiful and sustainable places that bring people together in community. Through his leadership in Communitecture and it’s various affiliates such as the The City Repair Project (501(c)3), The Village Building Convergence, and the Planet Repair Institute, he has also been instrumental in the development of dozens of participatory organizations and urban permaculture design projects across the United States and Canada. Mark works with governmental leaders, community organizations, and educational institutions in many diverse communities. He is also a partner with the CPID on efforts to address homelessness in Portland through the POD Initiative.  

Mark’s life-long dedication to building community through design began at his roots.  Both of his parents are activist architects and planners, and from the start they infused him with a sense of creative civic possibility. From his father’s work to create Portland’s Pioneer Square, to his mother’s investigations of the public spaces in Medieval and Neolithic villages, they both taught him to see constructive possibilities that can emerge when place is a reflection of the people who live there. Design can destroy the world, or it can save it, help us savor it, and make the human world worthy of our people.  

The CPID Talks are aimed at fostering a dialogue about interesting work being done that is relevant to the public interest design field by inviting speakers from a wide variety of disciplines to share their work and thoughts in an informal setting. These talks are open to the public and held in the CPID office in the School of Architecture at PSU (Shattuck Hall 217).

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Apr
21
11:00am11:00am

Killian Doherty on Film Project Documenting Liberian town of Yekepa as a Vehicle to Explore Political Ecologies and Development

Killian Doherty is an architect from Northern Ireland and runs Architectural Field Office, a small collaborative practice. His research interests lie within the exploration of fragmented sites, settlements, and cities at specific thresholds of racial, ethnic, or religious conflict. He has worked on a number of post-conflict reconstruction projects in Sierra Leone and Rwanda. He is registered for a PhD by Design at the Bartlett School of Architecture (UCL) where he is working with an indigenous community in Rwanda and trying to work through the architect as social spatial practitioner, as opposed to designer of buildings. He is currently a Visiting Scholar with the Center for Public Interest Design through June 2017.

Doherty will be discussing a film that he is working on that documents a settlement built in northern Liberia in the early 1960s by a Swedish mining company to accommodate workers at a nearby iron ore mine. Within only a few years this housing program had transformed into a fully functioning town called Yekepa. Built along Scandinavian lines but located in the remote highlands of Liberia, Yekepa soon became a symbol of the utopian promises attached to the West’s investment in the natural resources of a developing nation.

But as the iron-ore reserves became depleted, Yekepa fell into disrepair, a ghost town haunted by the memories of past prosperity. Now partly repopulated by workers of another mining firm, Yekepa has returned to life, but its fortunes are starkly dependent on the price of iron-ore on the world market.

Doherty and filmmaker Edward Lawrenson visited Yekepa to chronicle its unusual history and uncertain future. Having spoken to past and present residents of Yekepa – both in Liberia and in Sweden – they are making a documentary about the town. Doherty will be discussing the film as a vehicle to explore themes of political ecologies and development at the heart of his design work.

CPID Talks
Center for Public Interest Design
Shattuck Hall Room 217
SW Broadway & Hall Streets
Portland, Oregon

Free and open to the public.

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Feb
27
12:00pm12:00pm

Kai Wood Mah & Patrick Lynn Rivers (Afield) on Research-Creation

Kai Wood Mah is a registered architect with the Ordre des architects du Québec and Patrick Lynn Rivers is a political scientist. Together, they co-direct Afield (www.afield.ca), a design research practice based in Cape Town, Chicago, and Montréal. Afield projects range from studies of progressive refugee housing solutions in South Africa to repurposing solutions for a postindustrial Chicago community of color after the shuttering of a public school.

Afield’s current major project is Democratic Early Childhood Development. Funded by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) grant, Mah and Rivers use the project to design, construct, and study a prototype early childhood development (i.e., a crèche, or daycare) centre in poor rural and urban South African communities.

Beyond highlighting the challenges of the DECD project, Mah and Rivers will discuss their work through the lens of research-creation. They specifically promote research-creation as method enhancing assessment and innovation within international development programs.

CPID Talks
Center for Public Interest Design
Shattuck Hall Room 217
SW Broadway & Hall Streets
Portland, Oregon

Free and open to the public.

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Jan
13
11:00am11:00am

Eric Cesal on the Role of Design Amidst Changing and Contradictory Patterns in Disaster and Resilience

Eric J. Cesal is a designer, writer, and noted post-disaster expert, having led on-the-ground reconstruction programs after the Haiti earthquake, the Great East Japan Tsunami, and Superstorm Sandy.  Cesal’s formal training is as an architect, with international development, economics and foreign policy among his areas of expertise.  He currently serves as the Special Projects Director for the Curry Stone Design Prize.

He will be discussing the role of the design community amidst changing and contradictory patterns in disaster and resilience. Specifically, how present methods of socio-economic organization continually multiply the risks already shouldered by vulnerable communities.  How we organize a city, a neighborhood, a street and a building enhances either resilience or vulnerability.  The commodification of the built environment during the neoliberal era largely enhanced vulnerability while paying lip service to resilience, which is why we face ever-escalating costs for disaster.  

 As designers, our choices frequently and unwittingly capitulate to this ongoing agenda.  Our design decisions, while perfectly legal, effectively bury risk within the walls of our buildings and the layouts of our neighborhoods.  Cesal is currently working on a new book which seeks to unravel how and why our built environment has become unresponsive to disaster.

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Nov
18
10:00am10:00am

Peg Bowden on Human Migration and the US-Mexico Border

Peg Bowden, RN, MS, a retired public health nurse, lives in the Arizona borderlands (a sort of third country, as she puts it) with one foot in Mexico and the other in the U.S.A.  She volunteers at a migrant shelter in Mexico attempting to understand why thousands of people are willing to risk their lives crossing the Sonoran Desert into the U.S., where they are despised by so many.  She has written a book, A Land of Hard Edges, which reflects on the complexities of human migration.  Peg lives in a rammed earth home with her husband, Lester Weil, 2 dogs, a feral cat, and a lot of open range cattle.

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Nov
4
11:00am11:00am

Shawhin Roudbari on Cultures of Ethical Community Engagement

Shawhin Roudbari is an assistant professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Program in Environmental Design. He is interested in better understanding activism and political engagement in the design professions, domestically and transnationally. In his dissertation, for example, he studied ways Iranian architects connected with foreign professional institutions to shape political power at home.

Shawhin is working on two projects: the first is an extension of his dissertation to study ways activism is absorbed from the fringe into the mainstream of design professions. The second project, and the subject of his discussion with CPID, is a study of cultures of ethical community engagement in university programs that send architecture and engineering students to work in developing communities. This second project was recently awarded a National Science Foundation grant toward a three-year study of mechanisms of culture formation in “engineering for development” programs. 

By studying engineering and design programs side by side, Shawhin seeks to understand ways public interest design work by architects, planners, and civil engineers—as professionals engaged in the design and construction of the built environment—compare. He is looking forward to using this discussion to share his analytical framework and to engage the CPID community in brainstorming ways that framework can be extended from engineering to design programs. 

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Oct
21
9:30am 9:30am

Pamela Harwood (Ball State U) on Nature Play and Design Thinking

Pamela Harwood is a Professor in the College of Architecture and Planning at Ball State University and a registered architect and principal in the award-winning firm Harwood + Tabberson Architects. Professor Harwood’s primary research is in the area of educational environments, and a recent outdoor classroom project called Nature Play: Into the Woods with Design Thinking will be the focus of her talk. 

Nature Play is a multi-year project that involved the research, design, and construction of a nature-based outdoor learning environment for Head Start conducted through coursework with students. Framing community engagement through project-based teaching was paramount to the education process. Professor Harwood believes that this commitment to engaging a multiplicity of voices empowers students and ennobles scholarship. Putting research into action guided work in the design-build outdoor learning classroom with the primary goal of re-connecting children with the natural world by making developmentally appropriate nature-based education an enriching and sustainable part of their daily lives. In this interdisciplinary, team-taught, community-centered course designed around a real world need, the team sought to bridge a disconnect in academia that has been found between disciplines, students, faculty, and community. 

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Sep
30
12:00pm12:00pm

Dave Otte (Holst Architecture) on Designing for Portland's Most Vulnerable Citizens

Dave Otte is a principal with Holst Architecture with over 20 years of experience in the design and construction industry. Skilled in conceptual visioning, he pursues elegant solutions to his clients’ complex programmatic needs, remaining dedicated to architecture that is modern, appropriate, and sustainable.  

Dave’s focus at Holst is social impact by design, helping to create affordable housing and services for Oregon’s most vulnerable citizens. In 2013, he was honored with a BetterBricks Award in the Building Design category, which recognizes outstanding career achievements of building professionals who implement high-performance design and sustainable solutions. In 2012, the Daily Journal of Commerce profiled Dave and his work on Bud Clark Commons, a LEED Platinum resource center for the homeless with permanent supportive housing. He is also an active member of the architecture community. After helping design the LEED Platinum Portland Center for Architecture and serving as an AIA Portland board member and volunteer, he was elected AIA Portland President in 2015 and currently serves as the 2016 Vice President of the Center for Architecture. 

Dave will discuss how great design and architecture has been proven to enhance the quality of life, dignity, health, and safety for our most vulnerable populations. As a firm, Holst has seen the benefits that better design can have on the lives of others. Through doggedness and determination, Holst has become deft at creating high-quality designs for public and nonprofit projects, refusing to compromise quality while always meeting the schedule and budget. Dave will show how great design can truly impact vulnerable populations in meaningful ways, from at-risk youth to families in recovery to citizens experiencing homelessness. Quality design doesn’t need to be sacrificed in order to make public and nonprofit projects pencil. Holst’s focus on sustainability (saving energy costs for the lifetime of the building), durability (saving clients and users money for the long haul), high-quality local materials, and design for the safety and health of residents makes for compelling design solutions.

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May
20
12:00pm12:00pm

Anotnie Jetter (PSU, Engineering and Technology Management) on fuzzy cognitive mapping

The School of Architecture is proud to welcome Antonie Jetter, who joins us for CPID Talks on Friday, May 20, 10am to 11am, to discuss her work on Fuzzy Cognitive Map Modeling. Fuzzy Cognitive Map (FCM) Modeling is a novel method for collaborative modeling and planning that is gaining popularity in (among others) ecosystem management, participatory technology assessment, and scenario workshops. FCM modeling helps individuals and groups express their perspectives on complex issues and present their knowledge in a dynamic, computationally accessible format that can be used to simulate decision impacts. FCM models are well suited for collaborative planning on the community level: they are easy to create, are well understood by audiences with limited modeling expertise, and are easy to update to reflect the insights of additional model contributors. The talk will introduce fundamentals and illustrate the use of FCM with several examples from ongoing research projects, including community inputs into a transmission line project and community-based planning of wildfire management approaches.

Antonie is an Associate Professor of Engineering & Technology Management at Portland State University.  She teaches courses on new product development, entrepreneurship, and technology marketing to graduate students in engineering. Her research is focused on new product development, managerial cognition, and decision making and leads to insights and methods for managing the early stages of product innovation. In her dissertation, Antonie has pioneered the use of Fuzzy Cognitive Map as a product planning tool. Ongoing research uses Fuzzy Cognitive Maps to model community risk perceptions, drivers of technology acceptance among elderly patients and their caregivers, and differences in the mental models of product development engineers and product users. Antonie holds an MBA (1998) and a Ph.D. in Technology and Innovation Management (2006) from RWTH Aachen University, Germany and has seven years of industry experience in a large technology firm and a high-tech startup.

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May
13
12:00pm12:00pm

Mark Lakeman (City Repair, Communitecture) on creating sustainable public spaces

Mark Lakeman joins us for CPID Talks on Friday, May 13. Mark is a national leader in the development of sustainable public places. In the last decade he has directed, facilitated, or inspired designs for more than three hundred new community-generated public places in Portland, Oregon alone. He is a Principal and Designer at Communitecture Inc., a full service design firm that aims to create beautiful and sustainable places that bring people together in community. Through his leadership in Communitecture and its various affiliates such as The City Repair Project (501(c)3), The Village Building Convergence, and Planet Repair Institute, he has also been instrumental in the development of dozens of participatory organizations and urban permaculture design projects across the United States and Canada. Mark works with governmental leaders, community organizations, and educational institutions in many diverse communities.

Mark’s lifelong dedication to building community through design began at his roots.  Both of his parents are activist architects and planners, and from the start they infused him with a sense of creative civic possibility. From his father’s work to create Portland’s Pioneer Square, to his mother’s investigations of the public spaces in Medieval and Neolithic villages, they both taught him to see constructive possibilities that can emerge when place is a reflection of the people who live there. Design can destroy the world, or it can save it, help us savor it, and make the human world worthy of our people.  

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Apr
29
12:00pm12:00pm

Stuart Emmons (Emmons Design) on design and politics

Stuart Emmons will speak in an upcoming edition of CPID Talks on Friday, April 29. Stuart is an architect, urban designer, planner, craftsman, writer, advocate, manager, and activist. He is also a candidate in the race to become the next City Commissioner of Portland.

Stuart attended the School for American Craftsman at Rochester Institute of Technology, the London College of Furniture, and holds a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Pratt Institute and a Master of Architecture degree from Harvard University. Before attending Pratt, Stuart studied architecture and political science at Portland State University from 1979-1981. He leads Emmons Design, an architecture and planning firm which strives to bring fresh thinking and design to every project after research and listening. After decades of hands-on planning and design projects, Emmons' priorities now are focused on schools and affordable housing. These issues, as well as homelessness, are also among the key issues of his campaign. 

In addition to work in design, Stuart has been active in several large preservation campaigns.

He co-chairs the Friends of Memorial Coliseum with Brian Libby, leading a successful campaign in 2009 to convince the City of Portland to abandon their plans to demolish Memorial Coliseum and replace it with a minor league baseball stadium. He has also worked with Nathaniel Kahn, the son of the architect Louis Kahn, as co-chairs of Save the Salk, the massive international campaign they launched in 1993 to try to stop the building of an addition in the eucalyptus grove at the entry to the Salk Institute, a masterpiece of modern architecture designed by Louis Kahn in 1967.

The focus of Stuart’s talk will be "Portland Potential." He will discuss Oregon values, Portland values, our place in time related to other large cities in the US, and how these values can guide us through our challenges; get ourpriorities repositioned for maximum positive impact; get our reputation for excellence in planning, design and sustainability reestablished; raise up people left behind (so many more can enjoy the Portland phenomenon); and work to a city that is better than any of us think even possible, with a major improvement of social issues. 

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Apr
15
12:00pm12:00pm

Emily Fitzgerald (Emily Fitzgerald Photography) on photography as social practice

Emily Fitzgerald is a photographer, artist and storyteller. Her work explores the nuance and complexity of personal identity and its relationship to family, community and culture. In her practice, she consciously engenders direct participation and allows individual response to shape the process and outcome. Fitzgerald utilizes video and photography and applies socially engaged form and theory to create visual art where collaboration, co-authorship and ethical-representation is primary. As a social practice artist, she seeks to build empathy and inspire curiosity, introspection and reflection. Her creative collaborations have included the Portland Art Museum, Hollywood Senior Center, Zenger Farm, King Public School, Multnomah County Health Clinics, the City of Portland, and she is now beginning work on an intergenerational photo-based project in partnership with TriMet.

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Apr
1
12:00pm12:00pm

Alejandra Ruiz (PSU, Architecture + CPID) on universal design and accessibility in action

Alejandra (Alex) Ruiz will speak in an upcoming edition of CPID Talks on Friday, April 1. Currently pursuing her Master of Architecture degree at Portland State University, Alex is a designer from Mexico City and Center for Public Interest Design Student Fellow whose work addresses issues of equity and accessibility. Two such projects will be featured in the upcoming Venice Biennale, which she will be discussing at the talk.

Alex received her B.A. in Architecture from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (Taller Max Cetto-Facultad de Arquitectura), where her thesis explored accessibility and universal design in special education. The resulting project is a Multiple Attention Care Center (CAM), a school for children with different types of disabilities. This project, designed with several colleagues from UNAM, focused on how accessibility and universal design can be integrated in the design of special education infrastructure, including participatory design and community engagement. The CAM 43 project won Honorable Mention at the 2014 Public Interest Design Awards Mexico. The project is currently under construction.

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Mar
4
12:00pm12:00pm

Rachel Hill (Landscape Design) on food urbanism

Landscape designer Rachel Hill will speak in an upcoming edition of CPID Talks on Friday, March 4, about Food Urbanism. Throughout different cultures, ecosystems, and history there is one constant. All people must eat. But prior to food getting into our mouths, the process of planning, growing, processing and marketing, food systems are as unique as the land and people that make them. And the towns and cities, which often are shaped by this universal need, are equally as complex and distinctive. This talk will be a design exploration of 3-4 places in which she’s worked on “food urbanism” projects (Yuma, Arizona – Vis, Croatia – Rougemont, Switzerland – the Bronx, NYC), and efforts of planning and designing to (re)integrate food systems back into the places where people live.

Rachel got her MLA in Landscape Architecture and completed her Master's thesis in Yuma, Arizona, a wide, fertile plain of the Colorado River that was important to the Native Americans, and now the "lettuce capital of the world." From an arid borderland town with mega-agriculture, she traveled to a small Mediterranean island with an ancient and continuous viticultural tradition to work on a Fulbright Fellowship. This segued to a position with an architecture firm with a national science grant in a well-organized country where agriculture is as much tradition and tourism as it is calories. 

Coming full circle in many ways, she came back to the US and ended up working on a "food distribution center" in a dirty and dynamic gentrifying borough of New York City. Rachel's interests have always been rooted in how food systems can be responsive and flexible generators in design as well as essential components and tools when addressing social and environmental issues. She will present on that exploration - and where it could go as our cities re-find food systems as integral spaces.

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Feb
12
12:00pm12:00pm

Scott Moore y Medina and David Jaber (Blue Star Studio) on an Indigenous American owned full-service planning and architecture firm

Scott Moore y Medina and David Jaber of Blue Star Studio will speak in the next edition of CPID Talks, on Friday, February 12. The CPID Talks are aimed at fostering a dialogue about interesting work being done that is relevant to the public interest design field by inviting speakers from a wide variety of disciplines to share their work and thoughts in an informal setting. These talks are open to the public and held in the CPID office in the School of Architecture at PSU (Shattuck Hall 217).

Blue Star Studio is an Indigenous American owned, small-business enterprise committed to quality design and smart community building. As a full-service planning and architecture firm, they offer a broad range of services including feasibility, planning and design services to both private and public sectors. Blue Star Studio works well with those in community development, non-profits, developers, city, county, state, tribal and federal governments, engineers, other planners and architects, institutions and individuals. The firm's Lakota Nation Building at the Keya Wakpala Development project was a 2015 SEED Award winner.

Blue Star Studio believes that every interaction is a unique opportunity to bring out the best in every project. They work side by side with clients and collaborators to find beautiful solutions for the betterment of the communities they engage, through careful discovery, close listening, and smart design. They operate from a belief in the power of place that comes from a long term relationship between people and the land.

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Jan
22
11:00am11:00am

Alando Simpson (City of Roses Disposal & Recycling) on Material Disposal & Recovery AND Pedro Pacheco (ITESM) on Material Reuse in Architecture

Alando Simpson and Pedro Pacheco will speak in the next edition of CPID Talks, on January 22. The CPID Talks are aimed at fostering a dialogue about interesting work being done that is relevant to the public interest design field by inviting speakers from a wide variety of disciplines to share their work and thoughts in an informal setting. These talks are open to the public and held in the CPID office in the School of Architecture at PSU (Shattuck Hall 217).

Alando Simpson, who will present at 11am, is Vice President of City of Roses Disposal and Recycling and is an advocate for sustainability in the N/NE Portland Community. Alando is a North Portland native and came aboard City of Roses in 2004, providing assistance on both the administrative end as well as the trade. After graduating from Portland State University, Alando jumped straight into the mix as a full time general manager, and it was there where he placed his center of attention on shifting the organizations focus around sustainability and, most significantly, recycling. To that end, Alando has led the processes at City of Roses for the inception of construction waste reduction plans, waste and recycling education, recycling reports, and innovative formulas which highlight carbon offsets through recycling. Alando will be speaking about his work and the relationship between local material recovery facilities and sustainability in the building industry.

Dr. Pedro Pacheco, who will talk at 12 noon, is professor at the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), one of Mexico's premier universities. He coordinates and leads several academic programs the Tec, including the Master of Science in Design and Sustainable Development of the City, as well as the “Impulso Urbano” (Urban Impulse) program and the seminar “Civic Urbanism.” He is co-founder of the “Ten Houses for Ten Families-10 x 10” model, a research and educational program focused on working with low-income families in Monterrey to design and build housing and address public space and community issues. The program is well known internationally for effectively using the service-learning methodology as a tool to connect students with the realities of site and clients. Since 1994 Dr. Pacheco has provided consultancy and advice for private and public organization on projects ranging from housing prototypes to community centers and a botanical garden. In 2013, he created T-kio, a firm dedicated to community planning, design and construction as a vehicle to expand his services and to integrate other professionals in the consultancy work.

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Jan
8
12:00pm12:00pm

Alex Salazar (Salazar Architects) on Affordable Housing Design

Alex Salazar is principal of Salazar Architect, a small firm focused on creating big social and environmental impacts by working collaboratively with clients and community-based organizations. His architecture and urban design work draws upon contemporary precedents and neighborhood context to create unique, meaningful places rich in architectural character while affordable to build. Alex founded the firm in 2007 in the San Francisco Bay Area and opened a Portland office in 2014. His work has won numerous design awards including AIA San Francisco’s Young Architect Award and AIA California’s Community Housing Award.

Current work includes designing the NW 14th / NW Raleigh development for Innovative Housing Inc., in collaboration with LRS Architects, an affordable housing development which will serve extremely low-income / formerly homeless families. The 12-story, quarter-block building will have upwards of 92 units of housing, community rooms, social service office space and a gracious roof deck / open space with views of the Pearl District's North Park Blocks.

Alex will discuss his unique perspective on affordable housing, covering 25 years of design explorations that combine architecture with community empowerment efforts. He will review his current design practice and projects that address issues of power and inequity, his activist bent developed in San Francisco and Oakland while collaborating with tenant and homeless rights campaigns, and his formative year as Graham Foundation Fellow working on post-earthquake housing in rural India.

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Nov
13
12:00pm12:00pm

Brian Carleton (Carleton Hart Architecture) on Design for Intergenerational Living

Brian Carleton is founding principal of Carleton Hart Architecture, a 30-person firm focused on the development and empowerment of healthy communities. CHA has a 25-year history of community-oriented projects, including multiple models of housing and supportive living environments.

Recent work has included the development of intergenerational communities as a means for solving certain social issues. Our work in this area has focused on addressing the unique challenges of foster children and the families that desire to adopt them. Through the development of three-generation communities, we bring together foster children, adults who are seeking to grow a family through adoption, and elders who are seeking fulfillment and engagement. While this model is program intensive and depends largely on the commitment of the people who come together to form their intentional community, the architecture must support and encourage consistent social interaction and create a strong sense of permanency and home.

Brian will discuss the origins of the model, a brief history of its evolution, and walk through four projects that CHA has been involved in. He will also discuss the future of the model, both in the Northwest and throughout the country. There will be plenty of opportunity throughout the discussion for exchange of ideas.

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Oct
16
12:00pm12:00pm

Cat Goughnour (Radix + Right 2 Root) on the displacement of Portland's African American community

Cat Goughnour is founder and lead consultant of Radix Consulting Group. She will be presenting a session on some of her work and research around how Portland has served—or not served—its communities through housing, urban development, and economic planning and policy. In her work around housing justice, she has a particular focus on Portland’s black communities. She may touch on community mapping and redlining, and larger themes such as economic exclusion and urban displacement.

Cat was born and raised in a rural coastal town of Oregon, and has been an active member of the Portland community since 2002 (with some time away to complete a Master’s degree at the University of London). Cat graduated Magna Cum Laude from Portland State University, with a Liberal Arts degree in Social Sustainability and Philosophy, specializing in human rights and social justice. She attained an MSc in Race, Ethnicity and Post Colonial Studies from the London School of Economics and Political Science. 

Cat is currently a member of Metro’s Equitable Housing Work Group, and the Portland Housing Bureau’s North/Northeast Housing Strategy Preference Policy Technical Advisory Workgroup. She is also developing a community-based project which will get her out and about and will bring together her wide-ranging work, research, advocacy, and study and her unwavering commitment to serving the betterment of the community.

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Jun
24
12:00pm12:00pm

Horatio Law (Public Artist) on community engagement through public art

Horatio Hung-Yan Law is an interdisciplinary artist who works with common cultural artifacts to explore inter-cultural communication and the complex relationship between individual and community. He resides in Portland, Oregon, and is a faculty member at the Pacific Northwest College of Art. Law was born in Hong Kong to Chinese parents and moved to the US at the age of 16. With this multi-cultural background, he has developed an artistic practice whose subjects include the Chinese immigrant’s experience, reinterpretations of cultural icons, trans-cultural adoptions, the Iraq War, and the current culture of consumption. His work often tackles weighty subjects with ephemeral and unexpected materials, creating quiet, conflicting, meditative, and evocative works. In his work, public art and community residencies, Law deploys common cultural artifacts to explore issues of identity, memory and the loss and gain of cross-cultural struggle in the evolving global community. He is involved in making work that engages community and interacts with people from different backgrounds.

 
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Jun
19
12:00pm12:00pm

Killian Doherty (Architectural Field Office) on the architect as social spatial practitioner

Killian Doherty joins us for the next CPID Talk, where he will discuss the concept of the architect as social spatial practitioner. Killian Doherty is an architect from Northern Ireland and runs Architectural Field Office, a small collaborative practice. His research interests lie within the exploration of fragmented sites, settlements, and cities at specific thresholds of racial, ethnic, or religious conflict. For the past five years he has worked on a number of post-conflict reconstruction projects in Sierra Leone and Rwanda. He is registered for a PhD by Design at the Bartlett School of Architecture (UCL) where he is working with an indigenous community in Rwanda and trying to work through the architect as social spatial practitioner, as opposed to designer of buildings.

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Jun
10
12:00pm12:00pm

Jeremy Spoon (PSU, Anthropology) on Anthropology + Architecture

Dr. Jeremy Spoon's research focuses on how political, economic, and ecological forces influence ecological knowledge and understanding inside and around mountainous protected areas. He is interested in how power relations shape perceptions and knowledge of place and whether or not the local decisions of these actors are socially, environmentally, and/or economically sustainable at certain points in time and in different contexts. Dr. Spoon also strives to apply research findings to projects created in participatory ways.

He continues several interpretive planning projects that carry out collaborative research as well as building, landscape, and exhibit design for four U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Forest Service visitors centers, interpretive trails, picnic areas, lookouts, and campgrounds. Assisted by ten PSU graduate and undergraduate students, he worked with The Mountain Institute and federal agencies to host two inter-generational camping excursions with more than 100 Nuwuvi (Southern Paiute) participants in Nevada featuring cultural demonstrations, pine nut harvesting driving tours, and hikes. 

Dr. Spoon is continuing his long-term research with the Sherpa in the Mt. Everest region of Nepal, conducting exploratory studies on local perceptions of non-biodegradable litter as well as follow-up research on local knowledge of edible mushrooms and lichens. He recently started a position as a reviewer of the Disaster Management Plan for Sagarmatha (Mount Everest) National Park.

 
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Mar
6
12:00pm12:00pm

Anna Goodman on citizen architects: ethics, education and the construction of a profession

Focusing on twentieth-century America, Anna's talk will explore how educators have used "community design-build" to connect architecture to ideas of citizenship, racial justice and humanitarianism, and, in so doing, how they have shaped professional ethics and identity.

Anna Goodman is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. She has an Visiting Scholar appointment at the PSU Center for Public Interest Design for the winter and spring of 2015.

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